Author: Simo

Basic Skill “PERSERVERANCE”

This is the ability to not give up and truly believe you will eventually get it. You just have to stick with it long enough to get it. Everyone started exactly where you are today, as a beginner. Even your Sifu was a beginner at one time and had to learn the same lessons you are trying to learn today. Many times the lessons for them were much harder because they had to figure it out on their own. There is a formula for success called the three C’s. The three C’s stands for Commitment – Consistency – Camaraderie. To be successful, you must make a personal COMMITMENT to yourself and your training. You need to dediicate some personal time at home to review what you are trying to learn in class to determine what you remember. At first it might be a little frustrating because you will not remember much but this will sharpen your memory muscles and over time you will start remembering more. This leads to CONSISTENCY. You must have the ability to keep regular class attendance, even when challenges make it difficult to get to class. Through regular practice your body will adapt to the exercises and drills. Slowly your endurance and strength will increase making classes easier. You will start to notice incredible changes, as your attitude starts improving, your physical health starts improving,...

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Summary of Medical Research on Tai Chi, Broken Down by Relevant Hospital Departments

Sourced from the WorldTaiChiDay.org Medical Research Library Links, Harvard Health Publications, and the Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi Pulmonary Medicine: COPD. Conventional pulmonary rehab. programs focus on aerobic exercise and strength training to improve exercise capacity, quality of life, and symptoms in patients with COPD. Tai Chi extends the breathing techniques taught in pulmonary rehab. by integrating novel elements, such as progressive relaxation, imagery/visualization, mindfulness of breathing and overall body sensations, postural training, and coordinated patterns of breathing and movement. These additional therapeutic elements make Tai Chi an effective adjunct to conventional rehabilitation. Neurology Department: Parkinson’s disease. The New England Journal of Medicine published a study showing that Tai Chi can improve both balance and movement control for people who have Parkinson’s disease. The study at the Oregon Research Institute included 195 people who had mild-to-moderate Parkinson’s disease; they were randomly assigned to twice-weekly sessions of Tai Chi, or strength-building sessions, or to stretching … after six months, those who did Tai Chi were stronger and had much better balance than those in the other two groups. In fact, their balance was four times better than those in the stretching group and about two times better than those in the resistance-training group. The Tai Chi group also had significatntly fewer falls and slower rates of decline in overall motor control. (Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi....

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Year of The Horse – 2014

Once again we made our way south to celebrate the Chinese New Year with our Sigung Joe Maury and his wife, Sifu Sara ! They trained in the Chesepeake and Virginia Beach schools. Had a delicious New Year dinner at the Peking Duck. And by Sunday morning it finally hit 60 degrees and the sun was shining. What better day for some peaceful Tai Chi on the...

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What’s In Your Rank

It is said that the greatest value one can attain in kung fu training is “The will to exert and strive hard without stopping at anything.” Through the conditioning of your body, you discipline your mind and gain a greater understanding of yourself. By understanding yourself, you learn to live in harmony with your emotions and with your environment. Our exposure here in America to the many sport-like karate styles have made people put the most value on the achievement of rank, with black, of course, being the highest achievement. Although traditional kung fu styles nowadays have adapted to the color sash system to signify different levels of rank, it is not viewed in the same manner as in other styles of martial arts. It is not the color of your sash alone that measures the true level of one’s rank, but the knowledge and growth one has attained from the beginning of one’s training. It is said that “the journey we cross and the growth we have made both in our mind and body will determine our next level of training. Your teacher(s) work really hard on guiding you through your different levels of training and helping you grow mentally and spiritually in preparation of what’s to come. They help build your character, integrity and self-respect. Therefore each color rank brings you one step closer to the Sifu....

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